Torchwood: Captain Jack Harkness

Writer: Catherine Treganna

Director: Ashley Way

Producer: Richard Stokes

Summary: Jack and Tosh are trapped in the 1940’s and meets another Captain Jack Harkness, the one whose identity he assumed.

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Overview: The Colin Baker Era (1984-1986)

sixth doctor

6th logo

When Patrick Troughton met Peter Davison while filming “The Five Doctors”, he advised Davison not to be the Doctor for longer than three seasons. He took the advice and stepped down. He was replaced by Colin Baker, who had actually appeared in “The Arc of Infinity”. He was ecstatic, as he was a childhood fan of the show But he was unaware of how things would get.

About Colin Baker

Colin was born on June 8, 1943 in Waterloo, England. At 23, he enrolled at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He appeared as Bayban the Butcher in Blake’s Seven. He has also appeared on Top Gear and I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here!

“In all my travelling throughout the universe, I have battled against evil, against power-mad conspirators. I should have stayed here. The oldest civilisation: decadent, degenerate, and rotten to the core. Power-mad conspirators, Daleks, Sontarans, Cybermen – they’re still in the nursery compared to us. Ten million years of absolute power. That’s what it takes to be really corrupt.”–“The Ultimate Foe”

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Overview: The Peter Davison Era (1981-1984)

fifth doctor

neon logo

John Nathan-Turner became the final producer of Classic Doctor Who, having been part of the show since the 60’s. Tom Baker had stepped down as Fourth Doctor, and Nathan-Turner was poised to modernize Doctor Who with a new logo and new opening, and a new Doctor, Peter Davison.

About Peter Davison

Peter Davison’s real name is Peter Moffatt. He started out as a stage manager at the Nottingham Playhouse. He chose his stage name so he would not be confused with the director of the same name, who he later worked with at one point. Prior to his work on Doctor Who, his most famous role was as Tristan on the TV series All Creatures Great and Small. He was the youngest actor to play the Doctor before Matt Smith.

Peter Davison’s daughter Georgia appeared in “The Doctor’s Daughter” and later married David Tennant, the Tenth Doctor.

“The trouble with time travel is one never seems to find the time”–“The Caves of Androzani”

In a Nutshell

  • Catch Phrases: “Sorry, must dash!” and “Brave heart, Tegan.”
  • The Tom Baker era was the final era to have 6-part episodes. The Peter Davison era had mostly 4-part episodes, with some 2-parters as well.
  • The sonic screwdriver was destroyed in “The Visitation”. It would not be restored until the Doctor Who TV movie with Paul McGann as the Eighth Doctor.

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First: The Space Museum

space museum

Writer: Glyn Jones

Director: Mervyn Pinfield

Producer: Verity Lambert

Companions: Barbara Wright (Jacqueline Hill), Ian Chesterton (William Russell), Vicki (Maureen O’Brien)

Season: 2, ep. 7 (“The Space Museum”, “Dimensions of Time”, “The Search”, “The Final Phase”)

Summary: The Doctor, Ian, Barbara, and Vicki arrive on the planet Xeros, having jumped a time track. They discover their future selves are now exhibits in a museum. Vicki discovers that the natives are rebelling against a race called the Moroks, and they must help the rebels if they wish to prevent themselves from becoming exhibits.

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Overview: The Tom Baker Era (1974-1981)

tom bakerJon Pertwee stepped down, having lost his family. Phillip Hinchcliffe became the new producer and hired Tom Baker, who would go on to have the longest run as the Doctor yet.

About Tom Baker

Tom Baker was born in Scotland Road, Liverpool. He left school at age 15 to become a Catholic monk, but left after six years because he had lost his faith. In 1955, he began two years service in the Royal Army Medial Corps He was acting first as a hobby, but eventually became part of Laurence Olivier’s Theatre Company.  Despite the occasional movie role, he found it difficult to make end meet until he became the Doctor.

During his tenure, Doctor Who also began acting in Australia and the US making him the most popular Doctor at the time. After his tenure ended, Baker played Sherlock Holmes in a BBC adaptation of The Hound of the Baskervilles. He also played Puddleglum in the BBC adaptation of The Silver Chair.

“Of course I’m being childish! There’s no point in being grown-up if you can’t be childish sometimes!”–“Robot”

In a Nutshell

  • Catch Phrase: “Would you like a jelly baby?”
  • Tom Baker had three producers during his era. Phillip Hinchcliffe often included gothic horror themes, which caused controversy because it was deemed too frightening. Graham Williams went for a more light-hearted feel. John Nathn Turner began his run as the longest-employed (and final) producer by giving the show a new theme song and logo.
  • First appearance of Davros: “Genesis of the Daleks”
  • First appearance of the Zygons: “Terror of the Zygons”
  • First appearance of the “Crispy Master” (Peter Pratt version): “The Deadly Assassin”
  • First story set on Gallifrey: “The Deadly Assassin”
  • First appearance of Jago and Litefoot: “Talons of Weng-Chiang”
  • First appearance of the Black Guardian: “The Armageddon Factor”
  • First story arc: “The Key to Time”
  • First appearance of Geoffrey Beevers as the Master: “The Keeper of Traken”
  • First appearance of Anthony Ainley as the Master: “The Keeper of Traken”

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Editorial: Big Finish’s New Ninth Doctor Chronicles

ninth finishBig Finish is a great part of Doctor Who’s “expanded universe”. It helps “fill the void” between series, when no new Doctor Who is on. I like that they’re even publishing stories featuring the Tenth Doctor, River Song, and more.

Yet there is one series of stories that I’m not comfortable with Big Finish publishing.  They’ve recently started releasing new Ninth Doctor adventures. This is actually not the first time they’ve done stories featuring the Ninth Doctor.  When Doctor Who turned 50, one of the many things Big Finish released in celebration was an eleven-part miniseries called Destiny of the Doctors, with one story for each of the eleven Doctors. These stories were all narrated by the companions. Because they could not get Billie Piper or John Barrowman, their Ninth Doctor story Night of the Whisper was entirely narrated by Nicholas Briggs. Briggs actually did a passable impression of Eccleston for the narration. I don’t mind this because it was the 50th anniversary, and Destiny of the Doctors was a celebration of every era.

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Short Trips Volume 1: Police and Shreeves

short tripsWriter: Adam Smith

Directors: Nicholas Briggs & Ken Bentley

Producers: Nicholas Briggs & Martin Montague

Doctor: Seventh

Running Time: 21 minutes

Narrator: Sophia Aldred

Summary: Ace meets a Shreeve, a shape-shifting species that takes the form of the most dominant species on the planet.

Review: I thought the idea of a species that instinctively takes the form of the most dominant species on a planet was a great idea, but this story has the same problem as “The Death Dealer”–it’s too short for the full investment. I feel this could’ve been a full episode.

Overall: 5/10

 

Overview: The Jon Pertwee Era (1970-1974)

third doctor

1st 3rd logo

diamond

The Jon Pertwee Era marked the transition from black and white to color.  It brought many changes to the show’s structure, as this was the final era in which episodes were still being wiped. As a result of Troughton’s final serial “The War Games”, the Time Lords had exiled the Doctor on earth, taking away the one thing he valued most–freedom. Now, the menaces would have to come to him.

“Courage isn’t just a matter of not being frightened, you know. It’s being afraid and doing what you have to do anyway.”–Planet of the Daleks

About Jon Pertwee

Pertwee was born in Chelsea, England. Acting ran in his family–his father was an actor, and his cousin Bill was in the comedy Dad’s Army. His son Sean currently plays Alfred Pennyworth on Gotham.

Pertwee was an officer in the Royal Navy and was on the survivors of the HMS Hood after it sunk during WWII. After the war, he became a well-known comedy actor.

During his tenure as the Third Doctor, Pertwee felt as though the cast and crew were a surrogate family. He saw Barry Letts as a sort of surrogate father, and John Levene saw Pertwee as a surrogate father, as his relationship with his own father was estranged at best. He even had a close friendship with Roger Delgado, the first actor to portray the Master. In fact, it was his untilmely death that led to Pertwee’s departure.

After he left Doctor Who, Pertwee continued to find work. He was in Worzel Gummridge, and voiced for SuperTed. He also appeared in video games based on Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. He appeared as the Doctor in two stage plays and in a never-finished fan project (he died before it could be finished).

In a Nutshell

  • Catch Phrases: “Reverse the polarity”, “Oh good grief”
  • The Pertwee Era had shorter seasons than its predecessors. Season 7 had a total of 21 episodes; and seasons 8-11 had between 25-26. From season 8 on, no episodes were over 6 parts.
  • Two openings were used during this era, for the first time ever. A colorized howlaround was used for most of the era, while the final season introduced the famous “diamond logo”, which was used the longest in the show’s history.
  • First appearance of the Autons: “Spearhead From Space”
  • First appearance of the Silurians: “The Silurians”
  • First appearance of Roger Delgado as the Master: “Terror of the Autons”
  • First appearance of Omega, First multi-Doctor story: “The Three Doctors”
  • First appearance of he Sontarans: “The Time Warrior”
  • First mention of Gallifrey by name: “The Time Warrior”

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